June 14th Is Flag Day

May 29th, 2012 by Craig Mullins

In the month of July the United States celebrates their Independence, but twenty days before, on June 14th, they pay homage to their country’s flag with Flag Day.

Although not an official federal holiday (meaning banks and post offices are not closed), most states across the country commemorate the day in one way or another.

A Little Flag Day History:

– In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day.

– June 14, 1937, Pennsylvania became the first (and only) U.S. state to celebrate Flag Day as a state holiday, beginning in the town of Rennerdale.

– In August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress.

– Title 36 of the United States Code, Subtitle I, Part A, CHAPTER 1, § 110 is the official statute on Flag Day; however, it is at the President’s discretion to officially proclaim the observance.

– Fairfield, WA is home to perhaps the longest running Flag Day parade, with the first one occurring in 1909 or 1910.

Like any country’s flag, the American Flag is to be respected and revered. It’s a symbol of independence and unity…..one nation……indivisible; a representative of battles fought and won, and lives lost in the quest for freedom.

Many of us know that letting an American Flag touch the ground is a big no-no, but a lot of us don’t know much else about to treat the flag. Below are some pointers on how to properly display the American Flag on Flag Day and year-round.

-The flag is normally flown from sunrise to sunset.

– In the morning, raise the flag briskly. At sunset, lower it slowly. Always, raise and lower it ceremoniously.

– The flag should not be flown at night without a light on it.

– The flag should not be flown in the rain or inclement weather.

– After a tragedy or death, the flag is flown at half staff for 30 days. It’s called “half staff” on land, and “half mast” on a ship.

– When flown vertically on a pole, the stars and blue field, or “union”, is at the top and at the end of the pole (away from your house).

– The American flag is always flown at the top of the pole. Your state flag and other flags fly below it.

– The union is always on top. When displayed in print, the stars and blue field are always on the left.

– Never let your flag touch the ground, never…period.

– Fold your flag when storing. Don’t just stuff it in a drawer or box.

– When your flag is old and has seen better days, it is time to retire it. Old flags should be burned or buried. Please do not throw it in the trash.

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A Song of Our Flag by Wilbur D. Nesbit

Your Flag and my Flag!
And, oh, how much it holds –
Your land and my land –
Secure within its folds!
Your heart and my heart
Beat quicker at the sight;
Sun-kissed and wind-tossed,
Red and blue and white.
The one Flag – the great Flag – the Flag for me and you –
Glorified all else beside – the red and white and blue!

Your Flag and my Flag!
To every star and stripe
The drums beat as hearts beat
And fifers shrilly pipe!
Your Flag and my Flag –
A blessing in the sky;
Your hope and my hope –
It never hid a lie!
Home land and far land and half the world around,
Old Glory hears our glad salute and ripples to the sound!

flag day united states

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